Mirador de Cable, Picos de Europa, Spain

A mountain goat looking for love on the Mirador de Cable viewpoint, Picos de Europa, Spain

A guide awaits our munificence at the top, near the Mirador de Cable.

Mirador de Cable, up to Picos de Europa from Fuenté Dé

When we arrived at the Teleférico base station down below, the cloud cover at the top seemed quite clear but after an hour and a half of waiting and half an hour of travel time we arrived at the top at about 4pm and the clouds had also arrived.
As professional travelers and photographers we love blue skies and sunshine but it didn’t seem too important on this central massif of the Picos de Europa. The clouds lent drama and mystery to the spectacular, barren, high plateau, with peaks disappearing into invisibility. That being said we’d also like to try it on a sunny afternoon!

Mirador de Cable viewpoint, Picos de Europa, Spain

Mirador de Cable with the Teleférico station on the left and Fuente Dé somewhere below.

Mirador de Cable sights, Picos de Europa

A girl soaking in the view at Mirador de Cable, Picos de Europa, Spain

The bleak view north with trail leading to the Hotel-Refugio Aliva 4 kms (2. 5 miles) away. A couple of jeeps do the run from the cable car to the hotel for those who cannot do the walk easily.

Pink wild flowers at the Mirador de Cable viewpoint, Picos de Europa, Spain

The edge hosts a carpet of alpine flowers in spite of the hordes that stomp over here daily. Maybe that’s why they don’t have stalks. Evolution at work?

Hikers on the trail leading to the Hotel-Refugio Aliva, Picos de Europa, Spain

More serious hikers can circle round and down to the village of Espinama or the ambitious could trek on to Pico Tesorero (2, 570m/8, 432 ft) and Peña Vieja on fairly simple trails.

It’s 18kms of mainly downhill walking to Espinama on an unpaved track that should take about three or four hours. It’s well sign-posted and offers constantly changing views. This route is also popular with mountain bikers.

Espinama is also a base for tougher hikes (or possibly a jeep ride) to the mountain village of Sotres, from where trekking gets serious, with trips to Naranjo de Bulnes mountain range, along with Picu Urriellu (also known confusingly as Naranjo de Bulnes), a toothy peak at 2, 519 m (8, 264 ft) that is one of the two most popular climbs.

A glacial depression on the Vega de Liordes route, Picos de Europa, Spain

A glacial depression on the Vega de Liordes route. Photo by Drow.

The highest peak among the Picos de Europa is Torre de Cerredo at 2, 650m, but many others come close and are popular with mountaineers as well as mountain walkers, especially since there is a well-developed network of refuges in the region.